Back to article overview

Is this really the correct risk level for my region?

The coronavirus dashboard shows which risk level applies in each safety region. It also shows the number of positive tests and the number of hospital admissions in each region, and the risk level associated with those figures. It’s possible that a region’s risk level is not the level you’d expect based on the latest figures. This article explains why.

People in line keep their distance

This article explains the information on the pages about the risk level in the different safety regions, for example this page about the IJsselland safety region. You can find the latest figures for each safety region on those pages.

Risk level is reassessed every two weeks

In order to determine the risk level in a safety region, we look at the number of positive tests and the number of hospital admissions among inhabitants of that region. This is done once every two weeks on Monday, based on the figures for the previous week. If one of these figures gives cause to set a higher risk level than the other, the higher risk level applies. We update the dashboard every Tuesday. You can see what risk level applies where on the map on the homepage and on the safety region pages.

Go to the About the risk levels page and click ‘When does which risk level apply?’ to see the number of positive tests and the number of hospital admissions that go with each risk level.

Risk level map of the Netherlands

Why the risk level doesn’t always match the latest figures

The risk level is set for two weeks. Each safety region page has a card that shows the current risk level, like the card below for the IJsselland safety region.

Current risk level

If the situation gets better or worse during those two weeks, the risk level isn’t adjusted immediately, but only once those two weeks have passed. So it’s possible that the risk level doesn’t match the latest figures. Two other cards on the same page show the number of positive tests and the number of hospital admissions over the last seven days. These figures reflect the current situation and help you see what the risk level would be if it was reassessed now.

Picture of graphs about positive tests and hospital admissions

In the example above, the IJsselland safety region, the current risk level is ‘Concern’. It was set in mid-February based on the figures for 8 to 14 February. But you can see from the number of positive tests and hospital admissions that now, a week later, the situation has become much worse. The number of positive tests is ‘Serious’ and the number of hospital admissions is ‘Severe’. If the risk level for this safety region was reassessed now it would be ‘Severe’. However, it’s only been one week since the risk level was set and so it will remain at ‘Concern’ for now. If after two weeks have passed the figures are still high, the risk level will be adjusted.

This is why the risk level in a safety region may temporarily be higher or lower than you would expect based on the latest figures. The risk level is reassessed every two weeks. This can be done sooner if it is necessary in order to fight the pandemic.

Measures don’t change immediately

If the risk level in a region changes, the measures aren’t immediately relaxed or tightened. We have to look at what is happening in the rest of the country, too. At the moment the same measures apply across the whole country. If you want to know at what point measures can be relaxed, or when measures will be set by region instead of nationwide, go the ‘About the risk levels’ page and click ‘When can measures be eased?’.