Infections
- Coronavirus variants

Coronavirus variants

When a virus multiplies it can keep changing slightly. Sometimes a change makes a virus behave differently. This change creates a variant of the virus. Some variants can be more infectious or make people more sick. Vaccines may also be less effective against a variant. It is therefore important to know what variants occur in the Netherlands.

Last values obtained on Saturday, 4 December. Is updated on a weekly basis.

Source: RIVM

Coronavirus variants

This table shows what percentage of infections can be attributed to the different coronavirus variants detected in the Netherlands. The first column shows the name of the variant and the country in which the variant was first detected. The second column shows the percentages of each variant. The table also shows whether the percentage of a variant has increased, decreased or remained the same in relation to the previous measurement.

The information in the table is for the period from 15 to 21 November. The figures for the most recent weeks are not yet available. The table is updated weekly. Read more about the numbers shown here in the Explanation of the data presented.

VariantPercentage
Delta
100%
Gamma
0%
Lambda
0%
Mu
0%
Beta
0%
Omicron
0%
All other variants
0%

Value from Monday, 15 November - Sunday, 21 November obtained on Saturday, 4 December · Source: RIVM

Coronavirus variants over time

This graph shows how frequently a variant has been detected in the Netherlands. We only show variants designated as variants of concern by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) because of the potential risk that they pose. The samples of positive tests collected in the most recent week are still being analysed, so the figures for this week are still incomplete.

Select one or more variants for more information.

This graph shows how frequently a variant has been detected in the Netherlands. We only show variants designated as variants of concern by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) because of the potential risk that they pose. The samples of positive tests collected in the most recent week are still being analysed, so the figures for this week are still incomplete. Use the keyboard to navigate through the time in the graph. With the left and right arrow keys you can move backwards and forwards in time. Use the left angle bracket < to go back and the right angle bracket > to go forward. With page-up and page-down you make bigger steps. Use the Home key and End key to go to the beginning and end of the timeline.
  • The figures for the most recent week are not complete because samples are still being analysed.

Source: RIVM