About the risk levels

At least once every two weeks we review the coronavirus situation in the various safety regions. Based on this, each region is given a risk level.

The four levels of risk mean the following:

1. Caution

The situation is manageable. The number of new confirmed cases is low. There is sufficient healthcare capacity.

2. Concern

The situation is becoming difficult to manage. There are many new confirmed cases. Pressure on healthcare capacity is increasing.

3. Serious

The situation is serious. The number of new confirmed cases is large. Pressure on healthcare capacity is very high.

4. Severe

The situation is severe. The number of new confirmed cases is extremely high. Pressure on healthcare capacity is extreme.

We look at the number of new confirmed cases and the number of hospital admissions in a region to determine its risk level. The highest figure is what counts. For example, if the number of new confirmed cases is at the ‘serious’ level and the number of hospital admissions is at ‘concern’, the risk level for the region will be set at ‘serious’.

This table shows the range in values for the two indicators (new confirmed cases per 100,000 and hospital admissions per million inhabitants) at each risk level.

Example: in a particular region, the number of new confirmed cases per week is 80 per 100,000 inhabitants and the number of hospital admissions per week is 18 per million inhabitants. The risk level for that region is ‘serious’.

The government has three objectives:

  • to ensure maximum protection for people who are at greater risk of becoming seriously ill from COVID-19;
  • to avoid overburdening the healthcare system;
  • to monitor the spread of the virus closely and take action when necessary.

A lot of data is generated about coronavirus and the pandemic. The risk levels give everyone a clear overview of the most important figures and of the situation in each region.

At least once every two weeks – or more often if necessary – the risk level of each region is assessed on the basis of the number of new confirmed cases and the number of hospital admissions there. This assessment is done automatically. Changes to a region’s risk level are published each time on the dashboard.

The Outbreak Management Team (OMT) regularly reviews the indicators (number of hospital admissions and number of new cases) for each risk level. If they are no longer fit for purpose, the OMT advises the government on new values for these indicators. The OMT also investigates whether it is necessary to introduce new indicators to keep pace with the changing situation. For instance, a new testing policy, improved vaccination coverage or new virus variants could render the original indicators unsuitable.

The government determines which measures must be taken and has drawn up an opening plan. In it, the government shows how it can gradually ease the measures and open up society again. The opening plan is based on the coronavirus roadmap.

This page on this dashboard shows the measures that currently apply.